Song for Saturday: When all Your mercies

September 24, 2016 — Leave a comment

The song, “When all Thy mercies” was written over 300 hundred years ago. Fernando Ortega sings four of the 13 verses [the ones with an asterik] The first verses, which talk about God’s care for us when we are tiny, remind me of Psalm 139. In later verses, I hear echoes of Psalm 23.

*”When all Your mercies, O my God,
my rising soul surveys,
transported with the view, I’m lost
in wonder, love and praise.

Your Providence my life sustained,
and all my wants redressed,
while in the silent womb I lay,
and hung upon the breast.

To all my weak complaints and cries
Your mercy lent an ear,
Before my feeble thoughts had learned
to form themselves in prayer.

*Unnumbered comforts to my soul
Your tender care bestowed,
before my infant heart conceived
from whom those comforts flowed.

When in the slippery paths of youth
with heedless steps I ran,
Your arm unseen conveyed me safe,
and led me by Your hand.

Through hidden dangers, toils, and deaths,
Your love gently showed the way;
and through the pleasing snares of vice,
You wooed me far away.

O how shall words with equal warmth
the gratitude declare,
that glows within my ravished heart?
but You can read it there.

Your bounteous hand with worldly bliss
has made my cup run o’er;
and, in a kind and faithful Friend,
has doubled all my store.

Ten thousand thousand precious gifts
my daily thanks employ;
nor is the last a cheerful heart
that tastes those gifts with joy.

*When worn with sickness, often have You
with health renewed my face;
and, when in sins and sorrows sunk,
revived my soul with grace.

*Through every period of my life
Your goodness I’ll pursue
and after death, in distant worlds,
the glorious theme renew.

When nature fails, and day and night
divide Your works no more,
my ever grateful heart, O Lord,
Your mercy shall adore.

Through all eternity to You
a joyful song I’ll raise;
for, oh, eternity’s too short
to utter all Your praise!”

Modernized from Joseph Addison, 1712

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